News

19.06.2018
The 2017 Unbreakable report made the case that disaster losses disproportionately affect poor people. The Caribbean hurricane season of 2017 was a tragic illustration of this. Two category 5 hurricanes wreaked destruction on numerous small islands, causing severe damages on islands like Barbuda, Dominica, and Saint Martin. The human cost of these disasters was immense, and the impact of this devastation was felt most strongly by poorer communities in the path of the storms. And yet, amidst the destruction it is essential to look forward and to build back better.
13.06.2018
The Resilience Measurement Practical Guidance Note Series synthesizes existing technical documents into pragmatic guidance to assist practitioners in integrating core aspects of resilience measurement into their program assessments, design, monitoring, evaluation, and learning.
 
13.06.2018
Humanitarian crises are increasingly affecting urban areas either directly, through civil conflict, hazards such as flooding or earthquakes, urban violence or outbreaks of disease, or indirectly, through hosting people fleeing these threats. The humanitarian sector has been slow to understand how the challenges and opportunities of working in urban spaces necessitate changes in how they operate.
12.06.2018

Low levels of awareness of climate risks and the availability of climate services are significant barriers to climate adaptation in the electricity sector, according to new research from Germany. However, the research also finds that the underlying market opportunity for climate services remains strong.

11.06.2018
In the seven months since Hurricane Maria devastated the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, efforts to restore the island to normalcy have been frustratingly slow. As many as 62,000 residents—or about five percent of the population—are still without power, a condition that is not only an annoyance to those living in the darkness, but also a potential danger.
10.06.2018

Haznet

Back in 2002, as part of my engineering degree, I interned at the Regional Fire Department for the Russian Republic of Bashkortostan. As part of my duties, I organized years of statistics in dusty archives. When I compiled them in a simple excel graph, I was startled: the number of fires and the number of casualties increased dramatically between 1991 and 1992, with elderly hit the hardest. Something extremely significant had happened, something that fundamentally altered fire dynamics in the republic.