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For many years, numerous researches and risk reduction activists have emphasized the importance of public awareness and education for disaster risk reduction (DRR). These needs, due to human natural manipulation, have increased. The present study was aimed to assess and determine the evidence on the strategies for education of DRR.

Background: Millions of children are affected by disasters every year. Children need not be passive victims, however, but instead may contribute to disaster risk reduction activities.
Objective: This paper provides a theoretical foundation for children’s involvement in disaster risk reduction activities.
Method: The paper reviews and analyses the literature on children’s participation, on their developmental capacity to participate, and on disaster risk reduction activities involving children.
Results: Participation yields numerous potential benefits for children, including enhanced personal development and skills, self-efficacy, and interpersonal relationships, and for communities through improved social connections and networks and disaster preparedness.
Conclusions: Children are resources to be cultivated and mobilized for disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and resilience. Attention is needed to identify approaches to appropriately enlist, engage, and involve children in disaster risk reduction activities; to promote these efforts; and to evaluate these approaches.

CDKN’s Mairi Dupar says we must heed the IPCC’s 1.5°C Special Report and prevent further climate change that will harm the most vulnerable people – while ensuring that ambitious climate mitigation efforts do not disadvantage the poorest and most vulnerable people, either. Thankfully, pilot initiatives show that integrated adaptation, mitigation and poverty eradication are possible, and these can be scaled up.
The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5oC is of profound importance for policy-makers, business leaders, producers and consumers the world over. It is of particular consequence in the battle to end extreme poverty, and for anyone concerned with social justice.

UN Member States need “to share information […] to prevent, protect, mitigate, investigate, respond to and recover from damage from terrorist attacks on critical infrastructure facilities, including through joint training, and use or establishment of relevant communication or emergency warning networks.”

Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience Europe launches Preliminary Conference Programme Delivering an outstanding conference programme of international expert speakers contributing to the valuable discussion on protecting Europe’s critical infrastructure.

Part of the City of The Hague’s 2018 Cyber Security Week, Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience Europe will include topics of discussion such as: • Risk and Resilience in CIP and CIIP • PPP Role in CIP • Emergency Preparedness and Response in CNI • Cyber Security Legislation, Best Practice & Standards • Cyber Defence Strategies • Cyber Technologies to Prevent and Protect • SCADA Systems and IT/OT Integration • Emerging and Future Threats on CNI • Space Based CNI • Human Factors, Organisation Risk and Management Culture • Risk Management in Transport, Telecoms and Energy CIP

Europe’s Mediterranean regions have strong sunshine, bright blue seas, beautiful beaches, and pretty holiday houses immersed in pine forests that provide welcome shade. It sounds very inviting, but such a scenario is also perfect for severe wildfires such as the ones that killed 99 people this July in the popular holiday resort of Mati, in Greece.
Now, new research in Nature Communications suggests that the summer fire season in Mediterranean Europe is going to get worse. Under the hottest climatic predictions of 3°C warming, the area that is currently burned every year would double. Even more worryingly, 40% more area would be burnt even if the Paris Climate Agreement is fulfilled and warming stays below “only” 1.5°C.

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