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14.06.2019

This week under the framework of IPA DRAM workshop on one of the program results was organized in Rome. The Electronic Regional Risk Atlas was presented during the workshop enabling the participants to test its capabilities through series of practical exercises. Despite IPA DRAM beneficiary countries, who are in the same time DPPI SEE member states, participants from Bulgaria and Romania also followed the workshop and contributed to its final outcome. There is an ongoing consultation process towards continuation of this particular activity under DPPI SEE when IPA DRAM ends in November 2019.

15.05.2019

This week DPPI SEE Head of Secretariat is joining over 3500 delegates from 150 countries at the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction in Geneva, Switzerland.
The aim of the meeting is to assess the progress on Sendai Framework implementation. During the meeting the Global Assessment Report for 2019 was launched describing the state of risk across the globe highlighting what's new, spotting emerging trends, reveling disturbing patterns, examining behavior and presenting progress in reducing risks. All DPPI SEE member states are participating at the 
event showing their grate commitment to the cause.

Infrared images from the weather satellite GOES show the Camp Fire spreading during the four hours after ignition on Nov. 8, 2018, during which time it burned through the town of Paradise. Such images, downloaded quickly, could be used to alert fire, police and residents of developing wildland fires. (Image courtesy of Jeff Chambers)
 
While state and federal officials are looking ahead and worrying about the coming fire season and how to more quickly get in front of fast-moving blazes, a University of California, Berkeley, professor argues that the tools for rapid detection are already here.

A weather satellite, GOES 17 (GOES West), sits above California taking photos every five minutes that can show hot spots throughout the West. If visible light and infrared data from this geostationary satellite are downloaded quickly enough, a computer program could easily be written to search for hot spots and alert emergency responders within as little as 15 to 30 minutes.

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